TH1A —  Plenary Session 9   (20-Sep-18   08:30—10:30)
Chair: G. Burt, Cockcroft Institute, Warrington, Cheshire, United Kingdom
Paper Title Page
TH1A01 First Ever Ionization Cooling Demonstration in MICE 632
 
  • J.Y. Tang
    IHEP, Beijing, People’s Republic of China
 
  Funding: STFC, DOE, NSF, INFN, CHIPP and more
The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at RAL has studied the ionization cooling of muons. Several million individual particle tracks have been recorded passing through a series of focusing magnets in a number of different configurations and a liquid hydrogen or lithium hydride absorber. Measurement of the tracks upstream and downstream of the absorber has shown the expected effects of the 4D emittance reduction. This invited talk presents and discusses these results, and projects the future of ionization cooling.
Abstract submitted by the speakers bureau of the MICE Collaboration. If accepted, a member of the collaboration will be selected to present the contribution
 
slides icon Slides TH1A01 [6.524 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-LINAC2018-TH1A01  
About • paper received ※ 19 September 2018      issue date ※ 18 January 2019  
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TH1A02
From Laser Acceleration to Laser Proton Accelerator  
 
  • X.Q. Yan
    PKU, Beijing, People’s Republic of China
 
  Funding: MOST
A Compact LAser Plasma Accelerator (CLAPA) that can stably produce and transport protons with different energies less than 10 MeV, less than 1% energy spread and several to tens of pC charge is demonstrated. The high current proton beam with continuous energy spectrum and a large divergence angle was generated by using a high contrast laser interacting with micron thickness targets, which later was collected, analyzed and refocused by an electromagnetic lattice using combination of quadrupole and bending electromagnets. This is the first experiment that combines the laser acceleration with a fully functional beam line, realizing the precise manipulation of the proton beams with reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability . Spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP), the key technology of proton radiotherapy for malignant tumors, is then realized with laser accelerator for the first time.
 
slides icon Slides TH1A02 [9.232 MB]  
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TH1A03 High Brightness Electron Beams from Plasma-based Acceleration 637
 
  • A. Marocchino, A. Biagioni, E. Brentegani, E. Chiadroni, M. Ferrario, F. Filippi, A. Giribono, R. Pompili, A.R. Rossi
    INFN/LNF, Frascati (Roma), Italy
  • A. Bacci
    Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milano, Italy
  • A. Cianchi
    Università di Roma II Tor Vergata, Roma, Italy
  • V. Petrillo
    Universita’ degli Studi di Milano, Milano, Italy
 
  Funding: INFN-CNAF and CINECA for high performance computing resources. European Union Horizon 2020 programme N. 53782.
Plasma Wakefield acceleration is a promising new acceleration techniques that profit by a charged bunch, e.g. an electron bunch, to break the neutrality of a plasma channel to produce a wake where a trailing bunch is eventually accelerated. The quest to achieve extreme gradient conserving high brightness has prompted to a variety of new approaches and techniques. Most of the proposed schemes are however limited to the only plasma channel, assuming in the vast majority of cases, ideal scenarios (e.g. ideal bi-gaussian bunches and uniform density plasma channels). Realistic start-to-end simulations, from the photo-cathode to FEL via a high gradient, emittance and energy spread preserving plasma section, are mandatory for paving the way towards plasma-based user facilities.
 
slides icon Slides TH1A03 [25.814 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-LINAC2018-TH1A03  
About • paper received ※ 11 September 2018      issue date ※ 18 January 2019  
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TH1A04 The Proton Driven Advanced Wake Field Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) at CERN 642
 
  • S. Döbert
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wake field generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world’s first proton driven plasma wake field acceleration experiment. The experiment uses the 400 GeV proton beam from the SPS which travels through a 10 m long Rb-vapour plasma cell where it gets self-modulated and generates the plasma wake fields. Eventually an electron beam is injected externally to probe the wake-fields. AWAKE will has completed several experimental campaigns starting in 2016. Results from the initial characterization of the plasma cell and measurements of the seeded self-modulation of the proton beam will be presented. Experiments to accelerate externally injected electrons using the proton driven plasma wake fields will start in 2018 and first results will be reported.  
slides icon Slides TH1A04 [4.787 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-LINAC2018-TH1A04  
About • paper received ※ 12 September 2018      issue date ※ 18 January 2019  
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TH1A05 Jitter Study for the APS Linac Photo-injector Beam 647
 
  • D. Hui, M. Borland, J.M. Byrdpresenter, Y. Sun
    ANL, Argonne, Illinois, USA
 
  Funding: *Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.
The APS Linac photo-injector can deliver high brightness electron beams to the Linac Extension Area (LEA) for beam experiments such as TESSA (Tapering Enhanced Stimulated Superradiant Amplification). Beam jitter in the device-under-test (DUT) area of the LEA can adversely affect the quality of data for such experiments. In this paper, a start-to-end simulation of jitter is studied. Sources of jitter include photo-cathode drive-laser arrival time, laser energy, and RF phases and voltages of the photo-cathode gun and accelerating cavities. It is found that at the DUT the relative mean energy jitter is the most significant concern, and that improvements in the Linac RF voltage stability can help to reduce it. RMS energy spread are more sensitive to the laser timing and charge jitter. The laser timing jitter itself can be compressed by the magnetic chicane by a factor of 5.6.
 
slides icon Slides TH1A05 [4.377 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-LINAC2018-TH1A05  
About • paper received ※ 10 September 2018      issue date ※ 18 January 2019  
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TH1A06
Laser and THz Driven Deflection and Acceleration of Electron Beams  
 
  • S.P. Jamison
    STFC/DL/ASTeC, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire, United Kingdom
 
  Dielectric laser accelerators have shown very high accelerating gradients but the phase space that can be captured is very small due to the short wavelength. Moving to THz frequencies could potentially allow larger bunches to be captured and accelerated. Here the THz is generated via Cherenkov radiation in a non-linear dielectric from a laser pulse. Two schemes are proposed either by accelerating in a dielectric waveguide or by creating a travelling focus in the THz allowing direct acceleration.  
slides icon Slides TH1A06 [8.133 MB]  
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